2018 HSA limits announced

The IRS recently announced the 2018 inflation-adjusted limits for health savings accounts. For 2018, taxpayers can contribute up to $3,450 (up from $3,400 in 2017) for single coverage, or up to $6,900 (up from $6,750 in 2017) for family coverage.

The maximum out-of-pocket figures are: $6,650 for single coverage (up from $6,550 in 2017) and $13,300 for family coverage (up from $13,100 in 2017).

Summer business tip

Summer is a good time to do business entertaining. Normally, deductions for business entertainment and meals are limited to 50 percent of the expenses. However, you can write off 100 percent of the cost of a company picnic or other get-together. Note that you can’t restrict the outing to only a select few employees. Keep records of the cost, the date, the attendees, and the business purpose

Single people have financial considerations that differ from those who are married. But this doesn’t mean they should overlook financial planning

Whether you are a lifelong single person or you found yourself single through divorce or the death of your spouse, you have your own financial considerations and complications. Unfortunately, many single people overlook financial planning. Don’t make this costly mistake.

Financial and estate planning help you protect your earnings and your property. For single people who do not have someone to fall back on, planning for unexpected financial setback is especially important.

Protecting your earnings (your ability to provide basic needs for yourself and your dependents) should start with creating an emergency fund that could pay for your basic living expenses for six to twelve months. The fund should be separate from your other investments, readily accessible, and reserved solely for emergency use.

Insurance is an important factor when it comes to protecting your income. Disability insurance provides a steady income stream when you’re sidelined by illness or injury. Employers frequently offer disability policies, but they are also available through private insurers. Life insurance may not be a priority for you if you do not have dependents, but if anyone relies on you financially, a term life insurance policy would offer an income stream to your loved ones in the event of your death.

Asset protection is more complex. Through powers of attorney, you can appoint trustworthy people to make financial or medical decisions for you in the event you become incapacitated. By creating a will (and perhaps a trust) and naming beneficiaries for your IRA or 401(k) plans, you can ensure that your assets will go to the individuals or charities of your choice.

Your financial planning needs are unique. If you’d like to learn more about protecting your finances and property, let’s talk.

 Service charges vs. tips

 

Remember, service charges do not receive the same tax treatment as tips. Service charges are non-tip wages, and employers must treat them as such for tax withholding and filing requirements. Tips are payments made to employees by customers at the customer’s discretion. Service charges are extra fees a customer must pay to a business. Examples of service charges are fees imposed by restaurants for parties of six or more, cruise ship package fees, and hotel room service charges.

Two facts about your chances of being audited

Your chances of being audited are probably lower than you think. A look at the latest IRS statistics for 2016 reveals two interesting and reassuring facts about the risk of an IRS audit.

One of these facts is that audits are becoming less common. The number of individual tax returns the IRS audited fell to a 12-year low last year, to just above 1 million. Audits have been declining steeply over the last five years, which the IRS commissioner said was due in part to declining budgets and a smaller workforce.

Another fact is that IRS audits happen most often to the super-rich. The statistical chance of being audited increases dramatically for people of higher income levels.

For example, filers that made near the average U.S. income only had a 0.4 percent chance of being audited. That frequency doubled once annual incomes reached $200,000, and doubled again at incomes greater than $500,000. By the time a person reports $10 million in income, they have a one-in-five chance of being audited, according to IRS statistics.